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Canada Canada

When people knew the wholeness of the world,
                they knew that all are one with the world . . .

 

I lived and worked for four years in Toronto, Canada. While in Toronto, I managed to get around to Montreal and Quebec City and visit Niagara Falls, and once (shudder) even visit Buffalo.

I worked for Control Data Corporation (Canadian Division). Just two kilometres from work was the Mississauga Racquet Club, where I played squash just about every day and our coach was Aziz Khan of the famous Khan family.

Toronto is truly one of the world's best cities. There's so much to see and do, you have a hard time keeping pace. When in Toronto, you must visit the CN Tower—one of the tallest structures on the planet. The revolving restaurant is at 340 metres and the observation gallery is at 500 metres—on a clear day you can see all the way to Niagara Falls, 100 kilometres away.

I returned to Toronto in September of 2001. This time visited Niagara Falls where we sailed on the Maid of the Mist, had dinner at the top of the CN Tower, and bought loads of tropical fruits—Sweet Sops, Dragon Fruit, Sapodilla, and Mangosteens—in the fruit store in Chinatown.

Niagara Falls is the massive collection of waterfalls where the Niagara River flows from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie.

This picture shows the Horseshoe Falls fed from the Niagara River in the background.

Niagara Falls

 

Four major glaciations (ice ages) have occurred during the past two million years. The greatest advance of the glaciers took place during the last half-million years. During the last glaciation the ice masses gouged out the basins of what became the Great Lakes.

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